Archive for June, 2014

Free-spirited and precise in writing and the yard

1 bek751Once upon a time, my garden was planned and–thanks to a a more orderly person than I am–in relatively straight rows. Now I’m embracing what a book I’m reading calls “free spirited.” After all, I’m focusing on a lot of native and hardy plants and self-seeding perennials.

1 dadAs my cowboy dad lived in many periods of his life and my brother Chris famously sang in elementary school, “Give me land, lots of land under starry skies above. Don’t fence me in.”

IMG_0276This camas lily in my rain garden might be my favorite of all the things that bloomed this spring.

I loved stumbling onto this quote from Meriwether Lewis’ travel journal in June of 1806: “The quamash is now in blume and from the colour of its bloom at a short distance it resembles lakes of fine clear water, so complete is this deseption that on first sight I could I could have sworn it was water.”

http://www.hugheswatergardens.com/camas%20lilies.html

Wow. Can’t wait until I have a lake of those lilies!

???????????????????????????????The monkey flowers have been spread from one little spot last year and are adding such a great yellow to my life. All I have to do is keep the soil moist and I guess I’ll have these around until fall.

???????????????????????????????Something like blue-eyed grass is so delicate and teeny I would never have noticed it until I started working on my backyard certification and learning about native plants. I know that writing depends on what John Gardener calls precision of detail.  In The Art of Fiction, he says that for stories to work, readers must come to feel them physically, as if they were injected directly into each scene.

GSS and cows grazingGrowing up in Ethiopia slowed me down. With no distracting television or shopping or even changing seasons, it feels like I noticed–and soaked up the sensations–of the world. Even my boarding school, which we say was in the city of Addis Ababa, was pretty slow paced. Notice the grazing cows.

A fast-moving plot is one pleasure of reading. But give me the slow, precise, vivid, unexpected detail…on the page and in the yard for making me feel most alive.

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In this watermelon, the seeds stuck together

Inku and beach 007I don’t know why that title popped into my head, but I was thinking about my siblings. Some people don’t choose to hang out with their siblings now that everyone is all grown up. It stands to reason. Why not spend time with people who like to do what you like to do? But my siblings and I oddly all like reading and writing and music and processing our feeeeelings…and laughing…and plants.

Inku and beach 016My sister Cathy and I went on a yard tour last week–we saw Portland yards that are at least a “gold” in the Backyard Certification program, including one where a woman had turned her backyard into a little woodsy glen where she sometimes sleeps and eats and soon plans to take showers. While we were chatting, I discovered that Cathy loves to turn her compost. Huh. I love to turn MY compost. Go figure!

Inku and beach 019Jan got me started on sweet potato vines.  When we all went to a plant store last year, she pointed out two things that turned out to be BIG favorites of mine, one with its association to Ethiopia and the other an ornamental oregano. Cathy and Jan and I are all experimenting with sedums and vines and things with small, interesting leaves–and trees. Chris, though, knows more about trees than we do.

Inku and beach 034Caroline knows about trees, too, because of her little farm near Salem. They got a grant to plant something like 500 trees. She’s the one who gave me the Douglas Spirea and vine maples and red current and elderberry and other understory trees after the Backyard Certification volunteer said I needed that layer in my yard to provide habitat for birds.

These pictures were all taken when we gathered at the beach one weekend to interview Mom and Dad about memories of Ethiopia. Joy wasn’t there. She’s the only sibling who doesn’t live in Portland–but I like talking about yards and plants with her, too.

When I was about six years old, Ethiopian girls stopped coming to play because they were working in their homes–not going to school, not playing with the ferenji kids.Ethiopia+82Is it because of our odd remote upbringing that we got so stuck together and continue to like so many of the same things? I don’t know…but I do feel lucky.

Life imitates art imitates life

cover286When I started writing about Lanie’s garden, I admit that I was mostly working from memory–drawing on the details of my Dad’s garden in Ethiopia when I was a kid but even more from my various vegetable gardens that I plotted and planted and harvested and played around in after I had kids. In fact, I was helping rototill a garden plot the day my son David was born.

A few years later, David later grew an enormous pumpkin in North Dakota, which I was crazy enough to chop up for dinners. This is why I’m leery of vegetable gardens now. davidpumpkin015

 

Bekpumpkin016I thought growing things should be USED and not WASTED.  When the kids carved pumpkins, I was crazy enough to roast the seeds for us to eat, too.

I was raised to be practical. I was raised with a certain reverence for food and what it means to humans especially when they don’t have enough. I was also raised to be conscientious about choices and how we can make a difference even with little actions.

So I didn’t grow flowers. I barely NOTICED flowers.

flower2My mom was fond of her flowers in Ethiopia. We kids shamelessly grabbed any part of them we needed for our games–and they sometimes got stuck in our hands for photos–but they were just, um, frivolous. Decorative. Not. That. Important.

Let’s just say I was a little short-sighted. Lanie changed all that.

IMG_6915When I did my research for my little outside girl who realizes the power of her own backyard, I came to understand the intricate dance of life in a way I never had before.  Nothing is unimportant.

IMG_0362In fact…guess what? Planting a flower can be part of our little actions that can save the world.

I know this now as I listen to my heart going pitter pat as I watch bees and bumblebees in and out of the flowers in my garden. Here’s a smidge of this month’s news about bees:

“The mysterious vanishing of honeybees from hives can be directly linked to insectcide use, according to new research from Harvard University. The scientists showed that exposure to two neonicotinoids, the world’s most widely used class of insecticide, lead to half the colonies studied dying, while none of the untreated colonies saw their bees disappear.”

Check out birds. Check out butterflies. We humans are hard on the creatures who share space with us.

But turns out we can create little oases in our back yards. Birds and butterflies and bees need us to care. .Caroline farm (5)

 

???????????????????????????????And we need our backyards, too. At least I do. I feel centered and calm and present to every moment when I’m out in mine. I love it that I created Lanie based on kids–myself, my own kids, kids I met in my travels that year–and now I’ve become Lanie, crazy about backyard habitat, in love with my rain gardens and my native plants (like this blue-eyed grass) and all the flowers and interesting leaves and stems and seeds.

???????????????????????????????Art imitates life imitates art.